Budweiser Releases Throwback Beer

By Neat Pour Staff |

Dorm room legend holds that one time, a long time ago, Budweiser used a different formula that tasted really good, almost like the original Czech beer of the same name. Apparently, there is some fact behind the fable. This week Bud released a throwback beer based on Adolphus Busch’s old recipe, the limited-edition 1933 Repeal Reserve Amber Lager.

Despite the name, the beer really has little to do with the year 1933 or Repeal (which might explain why Bud chose not to release the brew on Repeal Day, December 5th). “The recipe behind Repeal Reserve dates back to the pre-Prohibition era when Adolphus Busch created and brewed a special Amber Lager for his friends and local community to enjoy,” according to Bud’s press materials. “Due to the onset of Prohibition in 1920, the beer didn’t have a chance to be distributed widely outside the St. Louis area… until now.”

Budweiser Releases New Limited-Edition 1933 Repeal Reserve, an Amber Lager in Celebration of Prohibition’s Repeal (PRNewsfoto/Budweiser)

The 6.1% ABV is an amber lager. The brewer describes a “light, hoppy aroma and a rich caramel-malt taste.” If packaging is your thing, you’ll be happy to learn Repeal Reserve arrives in old school, stubby bottles (think Red Stripe).

“We are excited to mark the upcoming holiday season and the anniversary of the repeal of Prohibition with this new brew based on a forgotten recipe,” said Ricardo Marques, vice president, Budweiser. “While Budweiser Repeal Reserve is a great tasting Amber Lager, it also tells the story of an important part of our history and gives reason for celebration.”

A-B InBev doesn’t do anything small; the rollout comes complete with some flashy corporate partnerships. On October 25th, Lyft will offer New Yorkers rides in a fleet of antique cars (with Budweiser branding.) Details here. Plus, Drizly will offer $5 discounts on your first order of Repeal Reserve with the code “Prohibition.” Also, there will be Clydesdales (there are always Clydesdales).

Read Next